Wayne T McCormack

Wayne T McCormack,

DIST TEACHING SCHOLAR & PROFESSOR

Department: MD-PATHOLOGY
Business Phone: (352) 294-8334
Business Email: mccormac@ufl.edu

About Wayne T McCormack

My faculty career here at UF shifted over ten years ago from an emphasis on basic research to a devotion to health science education research and the professional and career development of health science predoctoral and postdoctoral trainees. I began my faculty career as a basic scientist, investigating chicken antibody and T cell receptor genes, and transitioned to a chicken model of the human autoimmune disease vitiligo, and then into preclinical translational research on the genetics of susceptibility of human vitiligo. I also became involved in administration rather early in my career, and have been involved in virtually every facet of graduate program planning, curriculum development, recruiting & admissions, and administration. I have 19 years of experience at higher education administration, having served as the Associate Dean for Graduate Education and biomedical sciences PhD program director (2001-2011), MD/PhD program co-director (2007-2011 and 2018-date), and serving since 2009 as the director of the UF predoctoral program in Clinical & Translational Science and Principal Investigator of the TL1 training grant. I direct and teach in a graduate-level immunology course, and developed, direct, and teach in several professional development courses, including “Responsible Conduct of Biomedical Research”, “Fundamentals of Biomedical Science Education”, and “Team Science”. My administrative responsibilities now include directing the Office of Biomedical Research Career Development, which is charged with developing and implementing professional and career development programs for all UF Health Science Center predoctoral and postdoctoral trainees, and supporting training grant submissions, trainee tracking, and program evaluation. I also lead the “T Team”, a consortium of T32 program directors at UF, which meets at semiannually to discuss policy and administrative matters and share best practices.

Extramurally I have been active in professional working groups of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), including the Graduate Research, Education and Training (GREAT) Group and the Group on Educational Affairs. I served as the national Chair (2011-12) of the GREAT Group, which provides professional development to and fosters the development and exchange of best practices among faculty and administrative leaders of biomedical PhD, MD-PhD, and postdoctoral programs, and evaluates national policy developments that affect the recruitment and retention of new scientific talent. I co-led a project to develop a competency-based assessment model for science PhD training at the predoctoral and postdoctoral levels. I am actively involved in the national CTSA Consortium as a member of the CTSA Program Steering Committee, lead team for the Workforce Development Enterprise Committee, and executive committee of the TL1 Program Directors Group. I led the development of a national TL1 survey project now nearing completion, and co-led a national survey of TL1 trainees and KL2 scholars to assess the immediate impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on training. I’ve coauthored two papers describing measures of career outcomes and the status of current training for team science at CTSA institutions (Section C2). I also served for three years (2012-2015) as the president of Team-Based Learning Collaborative (TBLC), an international educational organization that promotes the understanding and evolution of team-based learning (TBL) across the educational community. Finally, I have fourteen years of experience teaching advanced adult leadership skills outside the university setting, as a training team leader at the local, regional and national levels for the Boy Scouts of America. I served as a member of a national task force that redesigned an advanced leadership course for adult leaders known as Wood Badge, was responsible for introducing additional active learning methods into the curriculum, and served as the director of the first national pilot course for the revised curriculum in January 2018.

Accomplishments

Exemplary Teacher
2019 · UF College of Medicine
Superior Accomplishment Award
2017 · UF College of Medicine
Academy of Distinguished Teaching Scholars
2015 · University of Florida
Exemplary Teacher
2013-2016 · UF College of Medicine
Gold Humanism Honor Society
2004 · Arnold P. Gold Foundation and Gold Humanism Honor Society
Society of Teaching Scholars
2003 · UF College of Medicine
Innovation & Research in Medical Education Award
2002 · UF College of Medicine

Research Profile

GRADUATE EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

My primary education research area focuses on innovative teaching and assessment methods in biomedical science graduate education. The TBL-based responsible conduct of research (RCR) training program I developed has been shown to have more positive impact on ethical decision-making than typical RCR curricula (a). I guided the development of TBL modules for inter-professional education, e.g., clinical ethics (b), patient safety, and health disparities, and for a variety of other basic and clinical science topics. With colleagues in the TBLC I have led efforts to promote research and scholarship related to TBL (c). My most recent work has led to the development of a set of core competencies for science PhD predoctoral and postdoctoral training and an accompanying rubric for competency-based assessment by trainees and mentors (d) and the definition of individual and team competencies for translational science teams (e). My analysis of a twenty-two year history of biomedical science career outcomes data reveal significant differences in career outcomes based on gender, nationality, and time since degree, but not for underrepresented minorities (unpublished). A novel team science training program has shown preliminary positive outcomes for student attitudes toward interdisciplinary collaboration and self-efficacy for conducting clinical research (manuscript in preparation).

a. McCormack WT, Garvan CW. 2014. Team-Based Learning Instruction for Responsible Conduct of Research Positively Impacts Ethical Decision-Making. Accountability in Research 21(1):34-49

b. Gregg A, Allen W, Black E, Davidson R, McCormack W. 2013. An Interdisciplinary Team-Based Learning Experience in Clinical Ethics. MedEdPORTAL http://www.mededportal.org/publication/9579

c. Haidet P, Kubitz K, McCormack WT. 2014. Analysis of the Team-Based Learning Literature: TBL Comes of Age. Journal on Excellence in College Teaching 25(3&4):303-333

d. Verderame MF, Freedman VH, Kozlowski LM, McCormack WT. 2018. Competency-Based Assessment for the Training of PhD Scientists. eLIFE 7:e34801

e. Lotrecchiano GR, DiazGranados D, Sprecher J, McCormack WT, Ranwala D, Wooten K, Lackland D, Billings H, Brasier AR. 2020. Individual and Team Competencies in Translational Science Teams. Journal of Clinical & Translational Science https://doi.org/10.1017/cts.2020.551

CLINICAL & TRANSLATIONAL SCIENCE and TEAM SCIENCE

As the Principal Investigator of the UF Clinical & Translational Science Award (CTSA) TL1 program, and director of our Clinical & Translational Science (CTS) PhD programs, I have been actively involved with other translational workforce development program leaders in the CTSA Consortium investigating optimal ways to train translational researchers. I have developed several CTS courses for PhD students here at UF. I have also been involved in two collaborative studies with other institutions, with a special interest in metrics for training assessment and methods for training in team science (a, b and e in previous section). I am piloting a novel team-training model in which PhD and dual degree students are engaged in interdisciplinary collaborative research while supported as “TL1 Teams” by our CTSA training grant. I co-mentored an MD-PhD education research project that examined current clinical research training methods used by MD-PhD programs and how effective they are in promoting self-efficacy for clinical research (c). I co-led the first national survey of TL1 programs (two manuscripts in preparation), and I co-led a national survey about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on training and career development in the TL1 and KL2 programs (d).

a. Lee LS, SN Pusek, WT McCormack, DL Helitzer, CA Martina, A Dozier, JS Ahluwalia, L Schwartz, LM McManus, B Reynolds, E Haynes, DM Rubio. 2012. Clinical and Translational Scientist Career Success: Metrics for Evaluation. Clinical and Translational Science 5: 400-407. PMID 23067352

b. Begg MD, Crumley CG, Fair AM, Martina CA, McCormack WT, Merchant C, Patino-Sutton CM, Umans JG. 2014. Approaches to Preparing Young Scholars for Careers in Interdisciplinary Team Science. Journal of Investigative Medicine 62(1):14-25. PMID 24169319

c. Sebastian M, Robinson MA, Dumeny L, Dyson KA, Fantone JC, McCormack WT, May WS. 2019. Training methods that improve MD-PhD student self-efficacy for clinical research skills. Journal of Clinical & Translational Science. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/cts.2019.419

d. McCormack WT, Bredella MA, Ingbar DH, Jackson RD, Meagher E, Morris C, Nagel J, Pusek S, Rubio DM, Sandberg K, Schnaper HW, Tsevat J, Umans JG, McIntosh S. 2020. Immediate Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on CTSA TL1 and KL2 Training and Career Development. Journal of Clinical & Translational Science https://doi.org/10.1017/cts.2020.504

HUMANISM IN MEDICINE

Another area of my education research has focused on the use of peer evaluation to assess medical student professional behaviors, with a special interest in humanism in medicine. A peer nomination survey I developed and continue to study was adopted as a student selection tool by the Gold Humanism Honor Society and is now in use at over 3/4 of our nation’s medical schools (a,b). Research not yet published has shown that patterns of medical student peer nomination are influenced significantly by the clinical clerkship experiences of the third year of medical school. This research was funded by the Arnold P. Gold Foundation.

a. McCormack, W.T., C. Lazarus, D. Stern, C.B. Stevens, P.A. Small, Jr. 2007. Peer nomination identifies medical student exemplars in clinical competence and caring at three medical schools. Academic Medicine 82(11):1033-9

b. Specter S, Kahn MJ, Lazarus C, Prislin M, Wong JG, O’Donnell J, McCormack WT, Kavan MG, López AM, House A. 2015. Gold Humanism Honor Society Election and Academic Outcomes: A 10 Institution Study. Family Medicine 47(10):770-775

GENETICS OF VITILIGO SUSCEPTIBILITY

Before my transition to education research, my research focused on human genetics of vitiligo susceptibility, supported by grant funding from the National Vitiligo Foundation and the American Vitiligo Research Foundation. Using case-control association studies, we found significant association with the catalase gene and genes of the TAP/LMP cluster in the HLA region (a,b). We collaborated with the VitGene Consortium in genome-wide association studies, which led to the discovery of many more human vitiligo susceptibility genes (c,d).

a. Casp, C.B., J.X. She, & W.T. McCormack. 2002. Genetic association of the catalase gene (CAT) with vitiligo susceptibility. Pigment Cell Res. 15:62-66

b. Casp, C.B., J.X. She, & W.T. McCormack. 2003. Genes of the TAP/LMP cluster are associated with the human autoimmune disease vitiligo. Genes & Immunity 4:492-499

c. Jin Y, SA Birlea, PR Fain, TM Ferrara, S Ben, SL Riccardi, JB Cole, K Gowan, PJ Holland, DC Bennett, RM Luiten, A Wolkerstorfer, JP Wietze van der Veen, A Hartmann, S Eichner, G Schuler, N van Geel, J Lambert, EH Kemp, DJ Gawkrodger, AP Weetman, A Taϊeb, T Jouary, K Ezzedine, MR Wallace, WT McCormack, M Picardo, G Leone, A Overbeck, NB Silverberg, RA Spritz. 2012. Genome-wide association study and meta-analysis identifies 13 new melanocyte-specific and immunoregulatory susceptibility loci for generalized vitiligo. Nature Genetics 44(6):676-80

d. Jin Y, Andersen G, Yorgov D, Ferrara TM, Ben S, Brownson KM, Holland PJ, Birlea SA, Siebert J, Hartmann A, Lienert A, van Geel N, Lambert J, Luiten RM, Wolkerstorfer A, Wietze van der Veen JP, Bennett DC, Taïeb A, Ezzedine K, Kemp EH, Gawkrodger DJ, Weetman AP, Kõks S, Prans E, Kingo K, Karelson M, Wallace MR, McCormack WT, Overbeck A, Moretti S, Colucci R, Picardo M, Silverberg NB, Olsson M, Valle Y, Korobko I, Böhm M, Lim HW, Hamzavi I, Zhou L, Mi QS, Fain PR, Santorico SA, Spritz RA. 2016. Genome-wide association studies of autoimmune vitiligo identify 23 new risk loci and highlight key pathways and regulatory variants. Nature Genetics 48(11):1418-1424

IMMUNOGLOBULIN AND T CELL RECEPTOR GENETIC DIVERSITY

During my predoctoral and postdoctoral training and early faculty years my research focused on the genetic diversification of rabbit antibody (a) and chicken antibody and T cell receptor genes (b-d). My research elucidated molecular mechanisms for antibody gene rearrangement and somatic diversification by gene conversion and contributed to the identification of chicken T cell receptor beta and gamma genes.

a. McCormack, W.T., S.M. Laster, W.F. Marzluff & K.H. Roux. Dynamic gene interactions in the evolution of rabbit VH genes: a four codon duplication and block homologies provide evidence for intergenic exchange. Nucleic Acids Res. 13:7041 7054.

b. McCormack, W.T., L.W. Tjoelker, L.M. Carlson, B. Petryniak, C.F. Barth, E.H. Humphries & C.B. Thompson. Chicken IgL gene rearrangement involves deletion of a circular episome and addition of single nonrandom nucleotides to both coding ends. Cell 56:785 791.

c. McCormack, W.T. & C.B. Thompson. Chicken IgL variable region gene conversions display pseudogene donor preference and 5′ to 3′ polarity. Genes Dev. 4:548 558.

d. McCormack, W.T., L.W. Tjoelker, G. Stella, C.E. Postema & C.B. Thompson. Chicken T-cell receptor beta-chain diversity: An evolutionarily conserved D-beta -encoded glycine turn within the hypervariable CDR3 domain. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88:7699-7703.

Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID)

0000-0002-2117-8727

Publications

2021
State of the Practice of Team Science in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology.
Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR. 1-15 [DOI] 10.1044/2021_JSLHR-21-00072. [PMID] 34433006.
2020
Immediate impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on CTSA TL1 and KL2 training and career development
Journal of Clinical and Translational Science. 4(6):556-561 [DOI] 10.1017/cts.2020.504.
2020
Individual and Team Competencies in Translational Teams
Journal of Clinical and Translational Science. 1-20 [DOI] 10.1017/cts.2020.551.
2019
Training methods that improve MD-PhD student self-efficacy for clinical research skills.
Journal of Clinical and Translational Science. 3(6):316-324 [DOI] 10.1017/cts.2019.419. [PMID] 31827905.
2018
Competency-based assessment for the training of PhD students and early-career scientists.
eLife. 7 [DOI] 10.7554/eLife.34801. [PMID] 29848440.
2016
Genome-wide association studies of autoimmune vitiligo identify 23 new risk loci and highlight key pathways and regulatory variants.
Nature genetics. 48(11):1418-1424 [DOI] 10.1038/ng.3680. [PMID] 27723757.
2016
Using Team Based Learning in a Large Interprofessional Health Science Education Experience
Journal of Interprofessional Education & Practice. 5:19-22 [DOI] 10.1016/j.xjep.2016.09.002.
2015
Gold Humanism Honor Society Election and Academic Outcomes: A 10 Institution Study
. 47(10):770-775
2015
Gold Humanism Honor Society Election and Academic Outcomes: A 10-Institution Study.
Family medicine. 47(10):770-5 [PMID] 26545053.
View on: PubMed
2014
An Interdisciplinary Team-Based Learning Experience in Health Systems and Inequalities
.
2014
Analysis of the Team-Based Learning Literature: TBL Comes of Age
. 25:303-333
2014
Analysis of the Team-Based Learning Literature: TBL Comes of Age.
Journal on excellence in college teaching. 25(3-4):303-333 [PMID] 26568668.
View on: PubMed
2014
Approaches to preparing young scholars for careers in interdisciplinary team science.
Journal of investigative medicine : the official publication of the American Federation for Clinical Research. 62(1):14-25 [DOI] 10.2310/JIM.0000000000000021. [PMID] 24169319.
2014
TBL Oversight for Continuous Quality Improvement and Acceptance
.
2014
Team-based learning instruction for responsible conduct of research positively impacts ethical decision-making.
Accountability in research. 21(1):34-49 [DOI] 10.1080/08989621.2013.822267. [PMID] 24073606.
2013
An Interdisciplinary Team-Based Learning Experience in Ambulatory Patient Safety
.
2013
An Interdisciplinary Team-Based Learning Experience in Clinical Ethics
.
2012
Clinical and translational scientist career success: metrics for evaluation.
Clinical and translational science. 5(5):400-7 [DOI] 10.1111/j.1752-8062.2012.00422.x. [PMID] 23067352.
2012
Genome-wide association analyses identify 13 new susceptibility loci for generalized vitiligo.
Nature genetics. 44(6):676-80 [DOI] 10.1038/ng.2272. [PMID] 22561518.
2011
Comprehensive association analysis of candidate genes for generalized vitiligo supports XBP1, FOXP3, and TSLP.
The Journal of investigative dermatology. 131(2):371-81 [DOI] 10.1038/jid.2010.337. [PMID] 21085187.
2011
Genome-wide analysis identifies a quantitative trait locus in the MHC class II region associated with generalized vitiligo age of onset.
The Journal of investigative dermatology. 131(6):1308-12 [DOI] 10.1038/jid.2011.12. [PMID] 21326295.
2011
Peer Feedback Tool for Lectures & Small Group Teaching
.
2010
Common variants in FOXP1 are associated with generalized vitiligo.
Nature genetics. 42(7):576-8 [DOI] 10.1038/ng.602. [PMID] 20526340.
2010
Immunology Team-Based Learning: Basic Concepts in Immunology
.
2010
Variant of TYR and autoimmunity susceptibility loci in generalized vitiligo.
The New England journal of medicine. 362(18):1686-97 [DOI] 10.1056/NEJMoa0908547. [PMID] 20410501.
2009
Immunology Team-Based Learning: Innate Immunity & Recognition of Antigen
.
2009
Immunology Team-Based Learning: Receptor Diversity & Antigen Presentation
.
2007
Peer nomination: a tool for identifying medical student exemplars in clinical competence and caring, evaluated at three medical schools.
Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges. 82(11):1033-9 [PMID] 17971688.
View on: PubMed
2003
Genes of the LMP/TAP cluster are associated with the human autoimmune disease vitiligo.
Genes and immunity. 4(7):492-9 [PMID] 14551602.
View on: PubMed
2002
Genetic association of the catalase gene (CAT) with vitiligo susceptibility.
Pigment cell research. 15(1):62-6 [PMID] 11837458.
View on: PubMed
2001
cDNA array analysis identifies thymic LCK as upregulated in moderate murine zinc deficiency before T-lymphocyte population changes.
The Journal of nutrition. 131(12):3189-96 [PMID] 11739864.
View on: PubMed
2000
T-Cell receptor Vbeta repertoire CDR3 length diversity differs within CD45RA and CD45RO T-cell subsets in healthy and human immunodeficiency virus-infected children.
Clinical and diagnostic laboratory immunology. 7(6):953-9 [PMID] 11063505.
View on: PubMed
1999
Crystal-cell interaction and apoptosis in oxalate-associated injury of renal epithelial cells.
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN. 10 Suppl 14:S457-63 [PMID] 10541283.
View on: PubMed
1999
Identifica-tion of a chicken “C” chemokine related to lymphotactin
. 65:87-93
1999
Identification of a chicken “C” chemokine related to lymphotactin.
Journal of leukocyte biology. 65(1):87-93 [PMID] 9886250.
View on: PubMed
1999
Purified donor T cells alone activate transplantation immunity to the male antigen but induce tolerance in combination with Mac-1+ donor cells.
Transplantation. 68(7):1024-9 [PMID] 10532545.
View on: PubMed
1998
Determination of primary amino acid sequence and unique three-dimensional structure of WGH1, a monoclonal human IgM antibody with anti-PR3 specificity.
Clinical immunology and immunopathology. 89(1):35-43 [PMID] 9756722.
View on: PubMed
1997
Impaired calcium mobilization and differential tyrosine phosphorylation in intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes.
Immunology. 91(1):81-7 [PMID] 9203969.
View on: PubMed
1996
Characterization of avian T-cell receptor gamma genes.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 93(26):15329-34 [PMID] 8986811.
View on: PubMed
1996
Chicken gamma delta T cells.
Current topics in microbiology and immunology. 212:55-69 [PMID] 8934810.
View on: PubMed
1993
Differential regulation of V(D)J recombination during development of avian B and T cells.
International immunology. 5(8):919-27 [PMID] 8398986.
View on: PubMed
1993
Excision products of TCR V alpha recombination contain in-frame rearrangements: evidence for continued V(D)J recombination in TCR+ thymocytes.
International immunology. 5(7):801-4 [PMID] 8396416.
View on: PubMed
1993
Germ line maintenance of the pseudogene donor pool for somatic immunoglobulin gene conversion in chickens.
Molecular and cellular biology. 13(2):821-30 [PMID] 8423804.
View on: PubMed
1993
Immunoglobulin gene diversification by gene conversion
. 45:27-45
1993
Immunoglobulin gene diversification by gene conversion.
Progress in nucleic acid research and molecular biology. 45:27-45 [PMID] 8341802.
View on: PubMed
1993
Recombination activating genes-1 and -2 of the rabbit: cloning and characterization of germline and expressed genes.
Molecular immunology. 30(11):1021-32 [PMID] 8350872.
View on: PubMed
1993
Special features of the development of the chicken humoral immune system.
Research in immunology. 144(6-7):467-75; discussion 475 [PMID] 8303068.
View on: PubMed
1991
Avian B-cell development: generation of an immunoglobulin repertoire by gene conversion.
Annual review of immunology. 9:219-41 [PMID] 1910677.
View on: PubMed
1991
Chicken T-cell receptor beta-chain diversity: an evolutionarily conserved D beta-encoded glycine turn within the hypervariable CDR3 domain.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 88(17):7699-703 [PMID] 1652759.
View on: PubMed
1991
Latent a1 VH germline genes in an a2a2 rabbit. Evidence for gene conversion at both the germline and somatic levels.
Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950). 146(6):2027-36 [PMID] 1900880.
View on: PubMed
1991
Selective expression of RAG-2 in chicken B cells undergoing immunoglobulin gene conversion.
Cell. 64(1):201-8 [PMID] 1986866.
View on: PubMed
1991
Thymocyte expression of RAG-1 and RAG-2: termination by T cell receptor cross-linking.
Science (New York, N.Y.). 253(5021):778-81 [PMID] 1831564.
View on: PubMed
1990
Characterization of chicken octamer-binding proteins demonstrates that POU domain-containing homeobox transcription factors have been highly conserved during vertebrate evolution.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 87(3):1099-103 [PMID] 1967834.
View on: PubMed
1990
Chicken IgL variable region gene conversions display pseudogene donor preference and 5′ to 3′ polarity.
Genes & development. 4(4):548-58 [PMID] 2113879.
View on: PubMed
1990
Evolutionary conservation of antigen recognition: the chicken T-cell receptor beta chain.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 87(20):7856-60 [PMID] 2236002.
View on: PubMed
1990
Somatic diversification of the chicken immunoglobulin light-chain gene.
Advances in immunology. 48:41-67 [PMID] 2112303.
View on: PubMed
1990
Templated insertions in the rearranged chicken IgL V gene segment arise by intrachromosomal gene conversion.
Genes & development. 4(4):536-47 [PMID] 2113878.
View on: PubMed
1989
Chicken IgL gene rearrangement involves deletion of a circular episome and addition of single nonrandom nucleotides to both coding ends
. 56:785-791
1989
Chicken IgL gene rearrangement involves deletion of a circular episome and addition of single nonrandom nucleotides to both coding segments.
Cell. 56(5):785-91 [PMID] 2493991.
View on: PubMed
1989
Evolutionary comparison of the avian IgL locus: combinatorial diversity plays a role in the generation of the antibody repertoire in some avian species.
International immunology. 1(4):332-41 [PMID] 2489032.
View on: PubMed
1989
Selection for B cells with productive IgL gene rearrangements occurs in the bursa of Fabricius during chicken embryonic development.
Genes & development. 3(6):838-47 [PMID] 2501152.
View on: PubMed
1988
Comparison of latent and nominal rabbit Ig VHa1 allotype cDNA sequences.
Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950). 141(6):2063-71 [PMID] 3139750.
View on: PubMed
1985
A reevaluation of rabbit anti-allotype antibody for the presence of cross-reactive idiotypes. I. A species-specific idiotype on rabbit anti-a1 antibody is recognized by guinea pig anti-IdX antibody.
Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950). 135(3):1961-6 [PMID] 2410508.
View on: PubMed
1985
A reevaluation of rabbit anti-allotype antibody for the presence of cross-reactive idiotypes. II. Expression of rabbit a1-like images on goat antibody after immunization with anti-a1 antibody.
Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950). 135(3):1967-74 [PMID] 2410509.
View on: PubMed
1985
Dynamic gene interactions in the evolution of rabbit VH genes: a four codon duplication and block homologies provide evidence for intergenic exchange.
Nucleic acids research. 13(19):7041-54 [PMID] 2997735.
View on: PubMed
1983
Monoclonal antibodies specific for the b5 allotype of rabbit kappa light chains.
Hybridoma. 2(1):97-107 [PMID] 6432680.
View on: PubMed

Grants

Jul 2021 ACTIVE
J. NRSA Training Core
Role: Principal Investigator
Funding: NATL INST OF HLTH
Jul 2021 ACTIVE
Together: Transforming and Translating Discovery to Improve Health
Role: Co-Investigator
Funding: NATL INST OF HLTH NCATS
Jul 2020 ACTIVE
Together Transforming and Translating Discovery to Improve Health
Role: Principal Investigator
Funding: NATL INST OF HLTH NCATS
Jul 2020 – Jun 2021
J. NRSA Training Core TOGETHER: TRANSFORMING AND TRANSLATING DISCOVERY TO IMPROVE HEALTH
Role: Principal Investigator
Funding: NATL INST OF HLTH NCATS
Jul 2019 – Jun 2020
J. NRSA Training Core
Role: Principal Investigator
Funding: NATL INST OF HLTH NCATS
Jul 2019 ACTIVE
COM CTSI Institutional Support
Role: Project Manager
Funding: FL CLINICAL PRACTICE ASSO
Apr 2018 – Jul 2019
Together: Transforming and Translating Discovery to Improve Health
Role: Principal Investigator
Funding: NATL INST OF HLTH NCATS
Apr 2018 – Jul 2019
Together: Transforming and Translating Discovery to Improve Health
Role: Principal Investigator
Funding: NATL INST OF HLTH NCATS
Jan 2018 ACTIVE
Training Program for Applied Research and Development in Genomic Medicine
Role: Other
Funding: NATL INST OF HLTH NHGRI
Apr 2017 – Mar 2018
Together: Transforming and Translating Discovery to Improve Health
Role: Faculty
Funding: NATL INST OF HLTH NCATS
Apr 2017 – Mar 2018
Together: Transforming and Translating Discovery to Improve Health
Role: Principal Investigator
Funding: NATL INST OF HLTH NCATS
Jul 2016 ACTIVE
Collaborating to Advance Teaching and Learning of Science Educators and Students (CATALySES)
Role: Other
Funding: NATL INST OF HLTH NIGMS
Apr 2016 – Mar 2017
TOGETHER: TRANSFORMING AND TRANSLATING DISCOVERY TOIMPROVE HEALTH
Role: Principal Investigator
Funding: NATL INST OF HLTH NCATS
May 2015 – Mar 2016
UF CTSI NRSA Training Core
Role: Principal Investigator
Funding: NATL INST OF HLTH
Jun 2014 – Feb 2017
Biomedical Explorations: Bench to Bedside Phase II
Role: Project Manager
Funding: NATL INST OF HLTH
Sep 2013 – Aug 2016
Team-Based Learning for RCR Education
Role: Principal Investigator
Funding: US DEPT OF HLTH AND HUMAN SER

Education

Postdoctoral Fellow
1987-1991 · University of Michigan, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
PhD
1983-1987 · Florida State University
MS
1979-1982 · Florida State University
BS
1976-1979 · Creighton University

Teaching Profile

Courses Taught
2016-2021
GMS6847 Translational Research and Therapeutics: Bench, Bedside, Community, & Policy
2017-2021
GMS6945 Team Science
2017,2020-2021
GMS7950 Fundamentals of Biomedical Science Education
2006,2009-2021
GMS6140 Principles of Immunology
2018-2021
GMS7877 Responsible Conduct of Biomedical Research
2009-2019
GMS6003 Fundamentals of Graduate Research and Professional Development
2006,2009-2017
GMS7003 Respon Conduct Biomed
2007,2009-2016
GMS7001 Funda Biomed Sci Edu
2006,2010-2015,2015-2016
GMS5905 Special Topics in Biomedical Sciences
2006-2007,2009-2014,2014
GMS6001 Fundamentals of Biomedical Sciences I
2011-2013
GMS6895 CTS Journal Club
2012
GMS6845 Clinical & Translational Research Practicum
2009-2011
GMS7002 Practicum Biomed Sci
2010-2011
GMS6065 Funda Cancer Biology
2009-2011
GMS7979 Advanced Research
2009-2011
GMS7980 Research for Doctoral Dissertation
2006-2007,2009-2011
GMS6090 Research in Medical Sciences
2010-2011
GMS6008 Fundamentals of Physiology and Functional Genomics
2009-2010
GMS6905 Independent Studies in Medical Sciences
2010
GMS6160 Introduction to Oral Biology I
2007,2009-2010
GMS6004 IDP Practical Laboratory
2009-2010
BMS4905 Medical Sciences Senior Research
2006,2009-2010
GMS6033 Immunity Hlth and Disea
2006,2009-2010
GMS6032 Mech of Host Defense
2006,2009-2010
GMS6031 Molecular Immunology
2010
GMS6193 Research Conference in Oral Biology
2009-2010
GMS6910 Supervised Research
2009-2010
GMS6971 Research for Master’s Thesis
2010
GMS6006 Fund Immunol/Microbio
2010
GMS6009 Drug Action Principle
2009
GMS6190 Seminar
2006-2008
GMS6901 Biology of Disease

Contact Details

Phones:
Business:
(352) 294-8334
Emails:
Business:
mccormac@ufl.edu
Academic Program Spec II:
Susan E Gardner
View Profile